Nov 15, 2013
japanesemodel:

Chiharu Okunugi and Sayo by Sylvie Malfray for Voguegirl Japan

japanesemodel:

Chiharu Okunugi and Sayo by Sylvie Malfray for Voguegirl Japan

(via tamponangel)

Nov 4, 2013
newwavefeminism:

chauvinistsushi:

heir2harlem:

The woman on the left is a mother from Miami who was so desperate to feed her hungry family that she was trying to steal a lot of food.
The woman on the right is Miami-Dade County Police Officer Vicki Thomas. Officer Thomas was about to arrest Jessica Robles but changed her mind at the last minute. 
Instead of arresting her, she bought Robles $100 worth of groceries:
“I made the decision to buy her some groceries because arresting her wasn’t going to solve the problem with her children being hungry.”
And there’s no denying they were hungry. Robles’ 12 year old daughter started crying when she told local TV station WSVN about how dire their situation was:
“[It’s] not fun to see my brother in the dirt hungry, asking for food, and we have to tell him, ‘There is nothing here.’”
Officer Thomas says she has no question that what she did was right:
“To see them go through the bags when we brought them in, it was like Christmas. That $100 to me was worth it.”
But Officer Thomas did have one request:
“The only thing I asked of her is, when she gets on her feet, that she help someone else out. And she said she would.”
And guess what? The story gets even better.
After word got out about what happened people donated another $700 for Jessica Robles to spend at the grocery store. 
And then best of all a local business owner invited her in for an interview and ended up hiring her on the spot as a customer service rep. 
She started crying when he told her:
“There’s no words how grateful I am that you took your time and helped somebody out. Especially somebody like me.”
And to think it all started with one veteran police officer trusting her “instinct” instead of going “by the book”.

hysterical sobbing

If only social policy used the same ideology. Solve the problem by alleviating the struggle as oppose to punishing the helpless.

newwavefeminism:

chauvinistsushi:

heir2harlem:

The woman on the left is a mother from Miami who was so desperate to feed her hungry family that she was trying to steal a lot of food.

The woman on the right is Miami-Dade County Police Officer Vicki Thomas. Officer Thomas was about to arrest Jessica Robles but changed her mind at the last minute. 

Instead of arresting her, she bought Robles $100 worth of groceries:

“I made the decision to buy her some groceries because arresting her wasn’t going to solve the problem with her children being hungry.”

And there’s no denying they were hungry. Robles’ 12 year old daughter started crying when she told local TV station WSVN about how dire their situation was:

“[It’s] not fun to see my brother in the dirt hungry, asking for food, and we have to tell him, ‘There is nothing here.’”

Officer Thomas says she has no question that what she did was right:

“To see them go through the bags when we brought them in, it was like Christmas. That $100 to me was worth it.”

But Officer Thomas did have one request:

“The only thing I asked of her is, when she gets on her feet, that she help someone else out. And she said she would.”

And guess what? The story gets even better.

After word got out about what happened people donated another $700 for Jessica Robles to spend at the grocery store. 

And then best of all a local business owner invited her in for an interview and ended up hiring her on the spot as a customer service rep. 

She started crying when he told her:

“There’s no words how grateful I am that you took your time and helped somebody out. Especially somebody like me.”

And to think it all started with one veteran police officer trusting her “instinct” instead of going “by the book”.

hysterical sobbing

If only social policy used the same ideology. Solve the problem by alleviating the struggle as oppose to punishing the helpless.

(via sugarbooty)

Aug 27, 2013

(Source: faceobok)

Jul 2, 2013

(Source: 0zu, via grcyslck)

Jun 16, 2013

princessfreakazoid:

watch this video. it is only one minute and it will make you very very happy :)

IT MADE ME VERY HAPPY!!!!

(Source: flightcub, via yvno)

Jun 10, 2013
humansofnewyork:

“I love her randomness.”“Tell me about a time she was random.”“Three hours ago. I went to pick her up, and I found her double-dutching on the sidewalk with some kids. Then she went inside and came out wearing this.”

humansofnewyork:

“I love her randomness.”
“Tell me about a time she was random.”
“Three hours ago. I went to pick her up, and I found her double-dutching on the sidewalk with some kids. Then she went inside and came out wearing this.”

May 24, 2013
African Americans do not use crack cocaine any more than whites. In fact, whites use it more African-Americans make up 13% of the population in the U.S. and they’re about 13% of the crack users. In other words, the rest of the users are white and brown, which is kind of amazing, because 90% of the crack cocaine defendants in the federal system are African-American.
The House I Live in, Documentary
May 24, 2013
In my view, it is not fair to have a 100:1 disparity in the difference between powder cocaine and crack cocaine. And let me explain what that means. A crack defendant with 5 grams of crack cocaine is treated the same as a powder cocaine defendant with 100 times more weight—in other words, 500 grams of powder cocaine. And I don’t think most people realize this. What is the different between powder cocaine and crack cocaine? Do you know? All crack cocaine comes from powder cocaine. The difference is, you add baking soda, water, and heat from an oven. That’s the only difference.
Honorable Mark Bennett, U.S. Federal Judge
May 24, 2013
The thing with the war on drugs is it tries to deal with a health problem as if it was a legal problem. Addiction is an effect of human unhappiness and human suffering. When people are distressed, they want to soothe their distress. When people are in pain, they want to soothe their pain. So, the real question is not “why the addiction?” but “why the pain?”
The House I Live In, Documentary
May 12, 2013

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